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New Scientist

Feb 12 2022
Magazine

New Scientist covers the latest developments in science and technology that will impact your world. New Scientist employs and commissions the best writers in their fields from all over the world. Our editorial team provide cutting-edge news, award-winning features and reports, written in concise and clear language that puts discoveries and advances in the context of everyday life today and in the future.

Elsewhere on New Scientist

Going circular • It is possible to remake our economy to use less and waste less

New Scientist

Andes ‘peak water’ looms • An analysis of glacier thickness suggests people living near the Andes will soon face problems accessing water, finds Adam Vaughan

El Salvador revamps bitcoin system • The country adopted the cryptocurrency as legal tender but its virtual wallet has problems

‘Mega comet’ from outer solar system is 137 kilometres wide

Dog waste may harm suburban nature reserves

Implants let people who were paralysed walk with support

DeepMind has made software-writing AI that rivals an average human coder

Chimps appear to treat wounds with insects

MPs want to speed up English gas boiler ban for new homes

Head-tingling videos may help people with anxiety

A blooming problem • Vast growths of harmful algae are choking lakes more frequently

Privacy policies get longer and harder to read

Learning in fruit flies may not be related to nature or nurture

New HIV variant discovered, but it is just as treatable

Stark inequality in covid-19 deaths • Death figures reveal the huge ongoing impact the virus is having on ethnic minority groups in England, reports Jason Arunn Murugesu

Rogue black hole found drifting alone through interstellar space

English language and Japanese songs evolved in same way

The transplant revolution • Leading surgeon David Cooper talks to Michael Le Page about a new era of transplantation in which genetically modified animals will supply organs for humans

A history of xenotransplants

Sensors spot most polluting cars in drive to clean up city

Mars pummelled by asteroids for longer

Electric insect wing trumps the real deal

Really brief

Quantum forces may solve friction puzzle

Simple test for lung tumours can pick up disease very early

Sticky tape is used to patch up innards

Love is the drug • Drugs to help people fall in love are increasingly becoming viable, but what about the ethics of them, asks Anna Machin

#Sapiens • Female fighter myths Stories of warrior women abound. Regardless of their veracity, they hold lessons about identity and the nature of sexual politics, writes Laura Spinney

Garden glory

Your letters

You can’t save them all • If we want to make good conservation decisions, we will have to take a long, hard look at which species we value and why, finds Simon Ings

Profit and loss • Leveraging human emotions for money is morally dubious, and will probably end in tears, finds Linda Marric

Don’t miss

The sci-fi column • What price immortality? Mickey7 is pacy, breezy and fun, yet it has a clear and serious message: anyone planning on uploading their consciousness should make time to read the small print, says Sally Adee

Waste not… want not? • We are using ever more stuff, and creating growing mountains of trash. Joshua Howgego asks how we turn this vicious circle into a virtuous one – for us and the planet

FOUR KEYSTONES TO CIRCULARITY • Moving to a circular economy that produces little or no waste requires four main things to be done.

CIRCULAR STUFF: CLOTHING

STUFF: A STATUS REPORT

CIRCULAR STUFF: ELECTRONICS

CIRCULAR STUFF:...


Expand title description text
Frequency: Weekly Pages: 60 Publisher: New Scientist Ltd Edition: Feb 12 2022

OverDrive Magazine

  • Release date: February 10, 2022

Formats

OverDrive Magazine

subjects

Science

Languages

English

New Scientist covers the latest developments in science and technology that will impact your world. New Scientist employs and commissions the best writers in their fields from all over the world. Our editorial team provide cutting-edge news, award-winning features and reports, written in concise and clear language that puts discoveries and advances in the context of everyday life today and in the future.

Elsewhere on New Scientist

Going circular • It is possible to remake our economy to use less and waste less

New Scientist

Andes ‘peak water’ looms • An analysis of glacier thickness suggests people living near the Andes will soon face problems accessing water, finds Adam Vaughan

El Salvador revamps bitcoin system • The country adopted the cryptocurrency as legal tender but its virtual wallet has problems

‘Mega comet’ from outer solar system is 137 kilometres wide

Dog waste may harm suburban nature reserves

Implants let people who were paralysed walk with support

DeepMind has made software-writing AI that rivals an average human coder

Chimps appear to treat wounds with insects

MPs want to speed up English gas boiler ban for new homes

Head-tingling videos may help people with anxiety

A blooming problem • Vast growths of harmful algae are choking lakes more frequently

Privacy policies get longer and harder to read

Learning in fruit flies may not be related to nature or nurture

New HIV variant discovered, but it is just as treatable

Stark inequality in covid-19 deaths • Death figures reveal the huge ongoing impact the virus is having on ethnic minority groups in England, reports Jason Arunn Murugesu

Rogue black hole found drifting alone through interstellar space

English language and Japanese songs evolved in same way

The transplant revolution • Leading surgeon David Cooper talks to Michael Le Page about a new era of transplantation in which genetically modified animals will supply organs for humans

A history of xenotransplants

Sensors spot most polluting cars in drive to clean up city

Mars pummelled by asteroids for longer

Electric insect wing trumps the real deal

Really brief

Quantum forces may solve friction puzzle

Simple test for lung tumours can pick up disease very early

Sticky tape is used to patch up innards

Love is the drug • Drugs to help people fall in love are increasingly becoming viable, but what about the ethics of them, asks Anna Machin

#Sapiens • Female fighter myths Stories of warrior women abound. Regardless of their veracity, they hold lessons about identity and the nature of sexual politics, writes Laura Spinney

Garden glory

Your letters

You can’t save them all • If we want to make good conservation decisions, we will have to take a long, hard look at which species we value and why, finds Simon Ings

Profit and loss • Leveraging human emotions for money is morally dubious, and will probably end in tears, finds Linda Marric

Don’t miss

The sci-fi column • What price immortality? Mickey7 is pacy, breezy and fun, yet it has a clear and serious message: anyone planning on uploading their consciousness should make time to read the small print, says Sally Adee

Waste not… want not? • We are using ever more stuff, and creating growing mountains of trash. Joshua Howgego asks how we turn this vicious circle into a virtuous one – for us and the planet

FOUR KEYSTONES TO CIRCULARITY • Moving to a circular economy that produces little or no waste requires four main things to be done.

CIRCULAR STUFF: CLOTHING

STUFF: A STATUS REPORT

CIRCULAR STUFF: ELECTRONICS

CIRCULAR STUFF:...


Expand title description text