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New Scientist

Apr 16 2022
Magazine

New Scientist covers the latest developments in science and technology that will impact your world. New Scientist employs and commissions the best writers in their fields from all over the world. Our editorial team provide cutting-edge news, award-winning features and reports, written in concise and clear language that puts discoveries and advances in the context of everyday life today and in the future.

Elsewhere on New Scientist

The big if • An explosive result in particle physics could change everything – maybe

New Scientist

Child hepatitis mystery • An unexplained rise in liver disease among young children is being investigated in the UK, reports Clare Wilson

Chernobyl spikes called into doubt

Shock result stuns physicists • The W boson is slightly heavier than we think it should be, according to data from Fermilab – and that could overturn our understanding of the universe, reports Alex Wilkins

Ancient computer may have had its clock set to 23 December 178 BC

Astronomers have spotted the most distant galaxy ever

Mobile phones as weapons • The way phones ping signals to communications towers is allowing Ukrainian and Russian soldiers to track the movements of opposition forces, finds Chris Stokel-Walker

Ancient Chilean tsunami scared local people away from coast for 1000 years

Fast-moving stars probably come from other galaxies

The Helsinki neighbourhood leading the way to zero-carbon cities

Is Amazon going to dominate space? • Its massive order for rocket launches over the next five years has gobbled up much of the global market, but it could spur new opportunities, says Paul Marks

Female wētās have two sets of genitals and eat ejaculate

How LFTs really work • As England changes its guidance around testing for covid-19, Clare Wilson looks at how lateral flow testing works

The plan to challenge aliens to a very slow game of chess

Male crossbills grow redder feathers when they exercise

UK jumps on crypto bandwagon • The UK government is going to launch a range of NFTs, and reactions to the plan have been mixed, reports Matthew Sparkes

Map created of brain changes from pre-birth to old age

Anchovies stirring up the sea may alter ocean mixing

Solar panels that can work at night

Fabric conditioners cut microfibre leak

Really brief

Triceratops was stabbed in the head

Robotic nurse can dress a mannequin in a gown

Rat pups born from lab-grown sperm

Mysterious beasts • Despite two centuries of incredible discoveries, there are some things we will never know about dinosaurs, says David Hone

Field notes from space-time • Taking on the invisible universe Dark matter is now my focus, but the difficult problems of dark energy and cosmic acceleration are still on my mind, writes Chanda Prescod-Weinstein

Winning shots

Your letters

Romancing the science • Is studying love still regarded as a lightweight option? A moving story of two neuroscientists who fall in love makes a strong case against that, says Elle Hunt

Truth and lies • The intriguing origin story behind the polygraph test should make us worry about extending its use, says Chris Stokel-Walker

Don’t miss

The film column • Stan’s secret mission The intelligent, moving Apollo 10½ is an animation about the fantasy world of a child obsessed with the space race. It took 18 years to make, and ended up owing as much to a movie pioneer as to high tech, says Simon Ings

The never-ending infinity story • Mathematicians might have finally made a breakthrough on a problem that has been baffling them for 150 years, says Timothy Revell

A RATIONAL PAIRING

IS INFINITY REAL?

Accountably...


Expand title description text
Frequency: Weekly Pages: 60 Publisher: New Scientist Ltd Edition: Apr 16 2022

OverDrive Magazine

  • Release date: April 14, 2022

Formats

OverDrive Magazine

subjects

Science

Languages

English

New Scientist covers the latest developments in science and technology that will impact your world. New Scientist employs and commissions the best writers in their fields from all over the world. Our editorial team provide cutting-edge news, award-winning features and reports, written in concise and clear language that puts discoveries and advances in the context of everyday life today and in the future.

Elsewhere on New Scientist

The big if • An explosive result in particle physics could change everything – maybe

New Scientist

Child hepatitis mystery • An unexplained rise in liver disease among young children is being investigated in the UK, reports Clare Wilson

Chernobyl spikes called into doubt

Shock result stuns physicists • The W boson is slightly heavier than we think it should be, according to data from Fermilab – and that could overturn our understanding of the universe, reports Alex Wilkins

Ancient computer may have had its clock set to 23 December 178 BC

Astronomers have spotted the most distant galaxy ever

Mobile phones as weapons • The way phones ping signals to communications towers is allowing Ukrainian and Russian soldiers to track the movements of opposition forces, finds Chris Stokel-Walker

Ancient Chilean tsunami scared local people away from coast for 1000 years

Fast-moving stars probably come from other galaxies

The Helsinki neighbourhood leading the way to zero-carbon cities

Is Amazon going to dominate space? • Its massive order for rocket launches over the next five years has gobbled up much of the global market, but it could spur new opportunities, says Paul Marks

Female wētās have two sets of genitals and eat ejaculate

How LFTs really work • As England changes its guidance around testing for covid-19, Clare Wilson looks at how lateral flow testing works

The plan to challenge aliens to a very slow game of chess

Male crossbills grow redder feathers when they exercise

UK jumps on crypto bandwagon • The UK government is going to launch a range of NFTs, and reactions to the plan have been mixed, reports Matthew Sparkes

Map created of brain changes from pre-birth to old age

Anchovies stirring up the sea may alter ocean mixing

Solar panels that can work at night

Fabric conditioners cut microfibre leak

Really brief

Triceratops was stabbed in the head

Robotic nurse can dress a mannequin in a gown

Rat pups born from lab-grown sperm

Mysterious beasts • Despite two centuries of incredible discoveries, there are some things we will never know about dinosaurs, says David Hone

Field notes from space-time • Taking on the invisible universe Dark matter is now my focus, but the difficult problems of dark energy and cosmic acceleration are still on my mind, writes Chanda Prescod-Weinstein

Winning shots

Your letters

Romancing the science • Is studying love still regarded as a lightweight option? A moving story of two neuroscientists who fall in love makes a strong case against that, says Elle Hunt

Truth and lies • The intriguing origin story behind the polygraph test should make us worry about extending its use, says Chris Stokel-Walker

Don’t miss

The film column • Stan’s secret mission The intelligent, moving Apollo 10½ is an animation about the fantasy world of a child obsessed with the space race. It took 18 years to make, and ended up owing as much to a movie pioneer as to high tech, says Simon Ings

The never-ending infinity story • Mathematicians might have finally made a breakthrough on a problem that has been baffling them for 150 years, says Timothy Revell

A RATIONAL PAIRING

IS INFINITY REAL?

Accountably...


Expand title description text