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New Scientist

Sep 03 2022
Magazine

New Scientist covers the latest developments in science and technology that will impact your world. New Scientist employs and commissions the best writers in their fields from all over the world. Our editorial team provide cutting-edge news, award-winning features and reports, written in concise and clear language that puts discoveries and advances in the context of everyday life today and in the future.

Elsewhere on New Scientist

Barrier to change • Outdated research on therapies for menopause symptoms is letting us down

New Scientist

Deadly floods in Pakistan • Eight weeks of heavy monsoon rains have left a third of the country underwater and more than 1000 dead, reports Adam Vaughan

Synthetic mouse embryos with rudimentary brain grown in the lab

Anti-laser can make any object suck in light

Mucus has evolved at least 15 times in mammals

Conservative party’s online vote is vulnerable to hackers • Hacking concerns have dogged the Tory leadership contest in the UK. Should it ever have used online voting, asks Matthew Sparkes

Exoplanet CO2 spotted for first time • The distant world WASP-39b may have formed similarly to planets in our solar system

The complex rules of wrinkling have been worked out

Mutation-inducing drugs could raise virus dangers

Ageing can play havoc with face-recognition systems

Underwater data centre set for Pacific

Bacteria seep out from cracks in the sea floor

Best evidence yet that the mysterious ‘chameleon’ force doesn’t exist

Short ads could guard against fake news on YouTube

How fungi’s weird shapes evolved • Two distinct bursts of increasing complexity led to the many forms fungus species take

Psychedelic therapy helps some people quit alcohol

Squishy computer calculates based on how you squash it

Two-legged dinosaur is the oldest ever found in Africa

Rapid eye movements during sleep reveal where mice look in dreams

Plasmas could help make the world’s most powerful laser

Fossils hint at origins of bipedalism • An analysis of thigh and forearm bones suggests that early ancestors of humans began walking on two legs much earlier than we supposed, reports Clare Wilson

See the gas giant glow • The James Webb Space Telescope has taken an incredible image of Jupiter

AI-created lenses let camera ignore objects

3D-printed wood twists into shape

Battery charges in under a minute

Malaria vaccine using live parasites shows promise

Really brief

A lab the size of a planet • Studying the atmospheres of Venus and Mars can help us understand the human role in climate change on Earth, says David Grinspoon

Field notes from space-time • Welcome to my TED talk Giving a TED talk wasn’t easy, but I wanted to make sure my audience came away with a better understanding of dark matter, writes Chanda Prescod-Weinstein

The living dead

Editor’s pick

When plants play detective • From a marijuana database to the possible poisoning of the Buddha, this book tells the story of plants’ complex role in crime, says Kate Douglas

A future for climate refugees? • Helping those displaced by a warming world means rethinking human identity, argues a bold new book. James McConnachie explores

Don’t miss

The film column • Taking direction Five people in recovery from psychosis guide artist Marcus Coates as he recreates aspects of their experience in this series of disorienting and sometimes very frightening short films, finds Simon Ings

Taming the menopause • Hormone replacement therapy has garnered a bad reputation, but it might be time to rethink our relationship with the drugs – and the menopause itself. Caroline Williams...


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Frequency: Weekly Pages: 60 Publisher: New Scientist Ltd Edition: Sep 03 2022

OverDrive Magazine

  • Release date: September 1, 2022

Formats

OverDrive Magazine

subjects

Science

Languages

English

New Scientist covers the latest developments in science and technology that will impact your world. New Scientist employs and commissions the best writers in their fields from all over the world. Our editorial team provide cutting-edge news, award-winning features and reports, written in concise and clear language that puts discoveries and advances in the context of everyday life today and in the future.

Elsewhere on New Scientist

Barrier to change • Outdated research on therapies for menopause symptoms is letting us down

New Scientist

Deadly floods in Pakistan • Eight weeks of heavy monsoon rains have left a third of the country underwater and more than 1000 dead, reports Adam Vaughan

Synthetic mouse embryos with rudimentary brain grown in the lab

Anti-laser can make any object suck in light

Mucus has evolved at least 15 times in mammals

Conservative party’s online vote is vulnerable to hackers • Hacking concerns have dogged the Tory leadership contest in the UK. Should it ever have used online voting, asks Matthew Sparkes

Exoplanet CO2 spotted for first time • The distant world WASP-39b may have formed similarly to planets in our solar system

The complex rules of wrinkling have been worked out

Mutation-inducing drugs could raise virus dangers

Ageing can play havoc with face-recognition systems

Underwater data centre set for Pacific

Bacteria seep out from cracks in the sea floor

Best evidence yet that the mysterious ‘chameleon’ force doesn’t exist

Short ads could guard against fake news on YouTube

How fungi’s weird shapes evolved • Two distinct bursts of increasing complexity led to the many forms fungus species take

Psychedelic therapy helps some people quit alcohol

Squishy computer calculates based on how you squash it

Two-legged dinosaur is the oldest ever found in Africa

Rapid eye movements during sleep reveal where mice look in dreams

Plasmas could help make the world’s most powerful laser

Fossils hint at origins of bipedalism • An analysis of thigh and forearm bones suggests that early ancestors of humans began walking on two legs much earlier than we supposed, reports Clare Wilson

See the gas giant glow • The James Webb Space Telescope has taken an incredible image of Jupiter

AI-created lenses let camera ignore objects

3D-printed wood twists into shape

Battery charges in under a minute

Malaria vaccine using live parasites shows promise

Really brief

A lab the size of a planet • Studying the atmospheres of Venus and Mars can help us understand the human role in climate change on Earth, says David Grinspoon

Field notes from space-time • Welcome to my TED talk Giving a TED talk wasn’t easy, but I wanted to make sure my audience came away with a better understanding of dark matter, writes Chanda Prescod-Weinstein

The living dead

Editor’s pick

When plants play detective • From a marijuana database to the possible poisoning of the Buddha, this book tells the story of plants’ complex role in crime, says Kate Douglas

A future for climate refugees? • Helping those displaced by a warming world means rethinking human identity, argues a bold new book. James McConnachie explores

Don’t miss

The film column • Taking direction Five people in recovery from psychosis guide artist Marcus Coates as he recreates aspects of their experience in this series of disorienting and sometimes very frightening short films, finds Simon Ings

Taming the menopause • Hormone replacement therapy has garnered a bad reputation, but it might be time to rethink our relationship with the drugs – and the menopause itself. Caroline Williams...


Expand title description text