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New Scientist

Mar 13 2021
Magazine

New Scientist covers the latest developments in science and technology that will impact your world. New Scientist employs and commissions the best writers in their fields from all over the world. Our editorial team provide cutting-edge news, award-winning features and reports, written in concise and clear language that puts discoveries and advances in the context of everyday life today and in the future.

Elsewhere on New Scientist

Vaccine conundrums • Even comprehensive vaccination roll-out isn’t a complete “jab and go” solution

New Scientist

US vaccine benefits • In the US, fully vaccinated people can now mix indoors without masks, but the guidance is deemed too risky for the UK, reports Adam Vaughan

The border problem • With some countries nearly covid-free, the only safe way to reopen borders may be to wait for herd immunity from vaccines, reports Donna Lu

Vaccinating the vulnerable first may be a flawed strategy

Vaccines may help clear up long-term covid-19 symptoms

Should you measure your antibody levels after a coronavirus vaccine? • Commercial tests that promise to measure your immune response aren’t very useful, at least for now, finds Helen Thomson

Anti-feminism is route to alt-right • An analysis of YouTube and Reddit comments has found evidence of radicalisation

Laser thruster could power spacecraft away from Earth

The universe may be unbalanced • The symmetry that supports our understanding of the cosmos might not be real

Fairy lantern has a ‘mouth’ and saps energy from fungi

Indian stone tool implies humans left Africa early

Concrete towers could loom high on the moon

Orbiting junk probably foiled study of oldest known galaxy

Planet hotter than most stars spotted 25 light years away

Microdosing may be all in the mind • Boost claimed from tiny doses of psychedelic drugs could be down to placebo effect

Fake bird flies by flapping wings made with goose feathers

A decade after disaster • The meltdown of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant saw locals evacuate the area. Now they have begun to return, reports Michael Fitzpatrick

Waste water worries

Food waste remains a huge problem around the world

Binding power of eggs revealed

European genome was altered by TB

Really brief

Sea slugs ditch body and grow a new one

Frogs take a deep breath to pick out the sound of a mate

Rubbery submersible braves deepest seas

Serving up hope • Food allergies are a growing, potentially life-threatening problem. The good news is we can turn this around, says Kari Nadeau

No planet B • Extinctions? What extinctions? There are a growing number of people who deny the threats that many species face. It is a worrying trend, writes Graham Lawton

Editor’s pick

The lion’s den

Down to the abyss • There is an abundance of weird and wonderful life in the depths of the sea – and Helen Scales is an excellent tour guide, says Eleanor Parsons

Your neighbours, the aliens • Solar Opposites puts aliens in an average US suburb with hints of Rick and Morty. It is silly, but has morals, says Gege Li

Don’t miss

The games column • The joys of discovery Watching my ship speed away as I float through space in Outer Wilds rivals moments in Gravity or Interstellar. It is just one reason why this time-loop adventure is among the best games ever made, says Jacob Aron

Why quantum is relative • Nothing truly exists – except in relation to other things. If we can get our heads around that one idea, we can begin to grasp the quantum realm, says Carlo Rovelli

Guarding the guardians • Protecting Earth’s biodiversity means empowering the people closest to it, says...


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Frequency: Weekly Pages: 60 Publisher: New Scientist Ltd Edition: Mar 13 2021

OverDrive Magazine

  • Release date: March 11, 2021

Formats

OverDrive Magazine

subjects

Science

Languages

English

New Scientist covers the latest developments in science and technology that will impact your world. New Scientist employs and commissions the best writers in their fields from all over the world. Our editorial team provide cutting-edge news, award-winning features and reports, written in concise and clear language that puts discoveries and advances in the context of everyday life today and in the future.

Elsewhere on New Scientist

Vaccine conundrums • Even comprehensive vaccination roll-out isn’t a complete “jab and go” solution

New Scientist

US vaccine benefits • In the US, fully vaccinated people can now mix indoors without masks, but the guidance is deemed too risky for the UK, reports Adam Vaughan

The border problem • With some countries nearly covid-free, the only safe way to reopen borders may be to wait for herd immunity from vaccines, reports Donna Lu

Vaccinating the vulnerable first may be a flawed strategy

Vaccines may help clear up long-term covid-19 symptoms

Should you measure your antibody levels after a coronavirus vaccine? • Commercial tests that promise to measure your immune response aren’t very useful, at least for now, finds Helen Thomson

Anti-feminism is route to alt-right • An analysis of YouTube and Reddit comments has found evidence of radicalisation

Laser thruster could power spacecraft away from Earth

The universe may be unbalanced • The symmetry that supports our understanding of the cosmos might not be real

Fairy lantern has a ‘mouth’ and saps energy from fungi

Indian stone tool implies humans left Africa early

Concrete towers could loom high on the moon

Orbiting junk probably foiled study of oldest known galaxy

Planet hotter than most stars spotted 25 light years away

Microdosing may be all in the mind • Boost claimed from tiny doses of psychedelic drugs could be down to placebo effect

Fake bird flies by flapping wings made with goose feathers

A decade after disaster • The meltdown of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant saw locals evacuate the area. Now they have begun to return, reports Michael Fitzpatrick

Waste water worries

Food waste remains a huge problem around the world

Binding power of eggs revealed

European genome was altered by TB

Really brief

Sea slugs ditch body and grow a new one

Frogs take a deep breath to pick out the sound of a mate

Rubbery submersible braves deepest seas

Serving up hope • Food allergies are a growing, potentially life-threatening problem. The good news is we can turn this around, says Kari Nadeau

No planet B • Extinctions? What extinctions? There are a growing number of people who deny the threats that many species face. It is a worrying trend, writes Graham Lawton

Editor’s pick

The lion’s den

Down to the abyss • There is an abundance of weird and wonderful life in the depths of the sea – and Helen Scales is an excellent tour guide, says Eleanor Parsons

Your neighbours, the aliens • Solar Opposites puts aliens in an average US suburb with hints of Rick and Morty. It is silly, but has morals, says Gege Li

Don’t miss

The games column • The joys of discovery Watching my ship speed away as I float through space in Outer Wilds rivals moments in Gravity or Interstellar. It is just one reason why this time-loop adventure is among the best games ever made, says Jacob Aron

Why quantum is relative • Nothing truly exists – except in relation to other things. If we can get our heads around that one idea, we can begin to grasp the quantum realm, says Carlo Rovelli

Guarding the guardians • Protecting Earth’s biodiversity means empowering the people closest to it, says...


Expand title description text