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New Scientist

Feb 05 2022
Magazine

New Scientist covers the latest developments in science and technology that will impact your world. New Scientist employs and commissions the best writers in their fields from all over the world. Our editorial team provide cutting-edge news, award-winning features and reports, written in concise and clear language that puts discoveries and advances in the context of everyday life today and in the future.

Elsewhere on New Scientist

Geology rocks • The discipline needs to reinvent itself – and be accorded the respect it deserves

New Scientist

Spring comes early • Warmer temperatures in the UK due to climate change are triggering spring flowers to bloom sooner, reports Clare Wilson

Lightning records set in the Americas

Giant pandas snub their cubs • When cubs are born via artificial insemination, panda mothers are more likely to reject them

Birthday wishes on social media are a security risk

One-third of birds tested in Australia have chlamydia

Gene variant in centenarians may help keep ageing at bay

We could save Earth from a planet-killer comet (if leaders listen to scientists)

Extreme marine heatwaves are the new normal

Another flavour of omicron • The BA.2 variant of the coronavirus is spreading fast, but it shouldn’t cause another worldwide wave, says Michael Le Page

Game theory shows how people crowd on rush hour trains

Whiteflies have acquired dozens of genes from the plants they eat

An explanation for the different blues of Uranus and Neptune

Hibernating ground squirrels recycle urine to survive

Google moves to drop cookies • Privacy concerns have pushed the web giant to change how it tracks us online, explains Matthew Sparkes

We ‘click’ better in conversations with quick responses

Gravitational wave echoes could reveal dark matter

Fossil skull may be Denisovan • Denisovan humans lived in east Asia during the Stone Age, and ancient bone fragments might give us our first glimpse of one of their skulls, finds Michael Marshall

Some bee colonies have to kill thousands of wannabe queens

First intergalactic supernova remnant may have been seen

Field notes Environment • How to clean up a river A partnership between farmers, the water industry and local volunteers may provide the answers to a river pollution crisis in England, finds Adam Vaughan in Oxfordshire

Cocktail of chemicals allows frogs to regrow lost limbs

Older adults boosted by vitamin D tablets

Cancer drug could be way to clear out HIV

Really brief

Mysterious signal beaming from afar

Robot gets to grips with delicate intestinal surgery

Home is where the magnetic field tilts

Saving the reefs • Coral gardening projects are more popular than ever, but they are a distraction from the real solutions, says Catherine Collins

This changes everything • The robo car uprising Numbers of self-driving vehicles are going up rapidly in California. It is a trend that might just lead to some unexpected outcomes, writes Annalee Newitz

Gone south

Your letters

Climate fiction’s call to arms • So-called cli-fi is galvanising readers into action with dark, yet all-too-possible futures. Bill McGuire picks some of the best

How stuff works • To know our future, we need to focus on understanding the world we live in now, finds Simon Ings

Don’t miss

The games column • What’s new for 2022 This year sees a good haul of new games, with post-apocalyptic adventures, zombies, aliens and a little light relief thanks to a puzzle-solving cat, says Jacob Aron

Quantum perspective • Our efforts to see reality from multiple points of view at once are revealing the strange part we all play...


Expand title description text
Frequency: Weekly Pages: 60 Publisher: New Scientist Ltd Edition: Feb 05 2022

OverDrive Magazine

  • Release date: February 4, 2022

Formats

OverDrive Magazine

subjects

Science

Languages

English

New Scientist covers the latest developments in science and technology that will impact your world. New Scientist employs and commissions the best writers in their fields from all over the world. Our editorial team provide cutting-edge news, award-winning features and reports, written in concise and clear language that puts discoveries and advances in the context of everyday life today and in the future.

Elsewhere on New Scientist

Geology rocks • The discipline needs to reinvent itself – and be accorded the respect it deserves

New Scientist

Spring comes early • Warmer temperatures in the UK due to climate change are triggering spring flowers to bloom sooner, reports Clare Wilson

Lightning records set in the Americas

Giant pandas snub their cubs • When cubs are born via artificial insemination, panda mothers are more likely to reject them

Birthday wishes on social media are a security risk

One-third of birds tested in Australia have chlamydia

Gene variant in centenarians may help keep ageing at bay

We could save Earth from a planet-killer comet (if leaders listen to scientists)

Extreme marine heatwaves are the new normal

Another flavour of omicron • The BA.2 variant of the coronavirus is spreading fast, but it shouldn’t cause another worldwide wave, says Michael Le Page

Game theory shows how people crowd on rush hour trains

Whiteflies have acquired dozens of genes from the plants they eat

An explanation for the different blues of Uranus and Neptune

Hibernating ground squirrels recycle urine to survive

Google moves to drop cookies • Privacy concerns have pushed the web giant to change how it tracks us online, explains Matthew Sparkes

We ‘click’ better in conversations with quick responses

Gravitational wave echoes could reveal dark matter

Fossil skull may be Denisovan • Denisovan humans lived in east Asia during the Stone Age, and ancient bone fragments might give us our first glimpse of one of their skulls, finds Michael Marshall

Some bee colonies have to kill thousands of wannabe queens

First intergalactic supernova remnant may have been seen

Field notes Environment • How to clean up a river A partnership between farmers, the water industry and local volunteers may provide the answers to a river pollution crisis in England, finds Adam Vaughan in Oxfordshire

Cocktail of chemicals allows frogs to regrow lost limbs

Older adults boosted by vitamin D tablets

Cancer drug could be way to clear out HIV

Really brief

Mysterious signal beaming from afar

Robot gets to grips with delicate intestinal surgery

Home is where the magnetic field tilts

Saving the reefs • Coral gardening projects are more popular than ever, but they are a distraction from the real solutions, says Catherine Collins

This changes everything • The robo car uprising Numbers of self-driving vehicles are going up rapidly in California. It is a trend that might just lead to some unexpected outcomes, writes Annalee Newitz

Gone south

Your letters

Climate fiction’s call to arms • So-called cli-fi is galvanising readers into action with dark, yet all-too-possible futures. Bill McGuire picks some of the best

How stuff works • To know our future, we need to focus on understanding the world we live in now, finds Simon Ings

Don’t miss

The games column • What’s new for 2022 This year sees a good haul of new games, with post-apocalyptic adventures, zombies, aliens and a little light relief thanks to a puzzle-solving cat, says Jacob Aron

Quantum perspective • Our efforts to see reality from multiple points of view at once are revealing the strange part we all play...


Expand title description text